Louise Lawler : The Tremaine Pictures
  • exhibition catalogue
  • wrappers
  • offset-printed
  • sewn bound
  • black-and-white & color
  • 24.5 x 24.5 cm.
  • 93 pp.
  • edition size unknown
  • unsigned and unnumbered
  • ISBN 3905829037

Louise Lawler : The Tremaine Pictures

Louise Lawler, Stephen Melville, Andrea Miller-Keller

Louise Lawler : The Tremaine Pictures

description

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held September 13 - October 20, 2007. "A member of the Appropriationist movement (alongside figures such as Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, and Sherrie Levine), Louise Lawler began her career in the late 1970s. Photographing works of art, she repositions them by examining both the way in which the public reacts to such works and the place that they occupy in the spatial, social, or economic environment. She therefore plays on the contrast between the way that a work of art is conventionally represented and the detail of its presentation. She often focuses less on the work than on its immediate surroundings. This in turn affects our perception of the work, which comes to be defined less by its putative 'essence' and more by the context in which it is seen : the collector's apartment, the museum, or the auction house. Over and beyond the issues of representation that her photographs seek to illustrate, Lawler's work is also that of a visual artist researching space and light to exquisite effect." -- introduction. Features the artist's photographs of a collection belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Burton Tremaine, taken between 1984 and 2007, as well as an essay entitled "A Thought of Photography," by Stephen Melville, and a collection of historical documents arranged by Andrea Miller-Keller. This section, entitled "Excerpts from Some Historical Documents about Louise Lawler, Emily and Burton Tremaine and the Tremaine Collection," or "You're going to love the thermostat next to the Miro," is a selection of articles, email correspondences, exhibition announcements, catalogue excerpts, statements, and other texts that document the Tremaines' feelings, decisions, and purchases regarding their collection. These writings are intermixed with documents regarding Louise Lawler's exhibitions, her interactions with museums and other institutions, and her reception by the press, enabling the reader to trace the trajectory of the relationship between artist, collectors, and the objects produced and gathered by each. Includes a biography of the artist and a list of works shown.